Posts Tagged ‘zinc’

#1 Stocking Stuffer: Cold-EEZE Oral Spray, Breaking Bad and Walt White Explains Zincum Gluconicum

Walt White explains Zincum Gluconicum

INT. DAY – DINER

WALT WHITE, a chemistry teacher and cancer-ridden drug lord, watches SINUS SISTER, who wears her FUR HAT indoors. CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS cannot improve the shabby diner where they sit, with a PAPER BAG on the table between them.

SINUS SISTER sneezes. She takes a bottle of COLD-EEZE from the FUR MUFF in her lap and holds it up to her ruby-red LIPS.

WALT

What’s that crap you’re spraying in your mouth?

SINUS SISTER

(sneeze)

It’s not crap. It’s Cold-Eeze. Mint flavour.

WALT

It’s probably just candy. Let me see.

SINUS SISTER whips the bottle of COLD-EEZE at WALT, so he can read the ingredients.

WALT

No, no, I stand corrected. There’s an active ingredient in here. Zincum Glyconicum.

SINUS SISTER

What’s that?

WALT

Zinc, you moron. Didn’t you just learn about zinc last week?

SINUS SISTER pulls a GUN from the FUR MUFF on her lap. She points it as WALT.

SINUS SISTER

You can talk to Jesse that way, but not to me. EXPLAIN ZINC.

WALT looks at the CANADA DRY CLOCK and swallows.

WALT

We don’t have time for this.

SINUS SISTER

No, we don’t have time for me to have a bad cold during the Christmas rush.

He sighs, shrugs in agreement, and reads the BOTTLE more closely. SINUS SISTER puts away her gun.

WALT

Zincum Gluconicum is a form of zinc bound to a substance which makes for better absorption.

SINUS SISTER

So it works?

WALT

Hang on. It recommends two sprays a day. That’s about 26 mg.

SINUS SISTER

That’s enough.

WALT

 Studies have shown that zinc can reduce cold symptoms drastically…

SINUS SISTER

…if you take it fast enough. Which I did. Two sprays last night.

WALT

And?

SINUS SISTER

Steady and holding, instead of full-on sick .

WALT

So, why are you asking me?

SINUS SISTER

You’re  Heisenberg.

SINUS SISTER slides the PAPER BAG toward WALT. He tucks it into his coat.

WALT

Are you going to tell me what’s in there?

SINUS SISTER

Stocking stuffers for the crew.

#1 Metallic Element for Winter: Zinc Fights the Common Cold

December 13, 2011  |  Survival Tips  |  , ,  |  6 Comments

Sinus Sister cozies up to the Periodic Table

Could it be true? Does zinc, or “Zn” to fans of The Big Bang, help fight the common cold? Or is it more marketing hype? I scoffed at the rumours, unwilling to buy yet another supplement. My nightstand already looks like a triage station. Yet, why not ask around? In the name of science—okay, in the name of not-being-sick—I found answers on Savvy Health, an authoritative blog by hottie Dr. Kim Foster. Here’s what I learned from Kim:

Does zinc help or is it hype?
Zinc seems to shorten the duration and severity of the common cold, in otherwise healthy people.

When should you take zinc?
As soon as you start to feel crappy (my word, not her’s). Because most viral replication happens within the first 24 hours of symptom onset, you’re going to get the most benefit from zinc if you start taking it on Day 1. That said, taking it within the first 3 days may still have benefit.

How much should you take?
Aim for at least 75 mg/day of zinc. The studies showing the most benefit used 75 mg as a minimum dose. Sinus Sister killed a cold, flat, with double that dose, but listen to Dr. Foster.

What form should you take?
It seems that contact time with zinc is important. Zinc lozenges appear to be most effective when you dissolve them slowly in your mouth (slowly, here, is sucking on a lozenge for 20-30 minutes), and doing this every 2 hours. Sinus Sister is too impatient to keep a lozenge alive for 20-30 minutes, so she burned through a small bag of lozenges in no time. Again, listen to Dr. Foster.

How does zinc work?
The exact mechanism of zinc is unknown, but it’s thought to assist T cells (a subset of white blood cells) which kill virus-infected cells.

Any potential harm?
Intranasal administration of zinc is not recommended–this has been linked with a loss of the sense of smell, which can be permanent. Yikes. And don’t overdo it with zinc. Large doses (more than 300 mg per day) can compete with copper and manganese absorption, and can interfere with T-cell function. It can also chelate some antibiotics and cause drug-drug interactions.

What about using zinc for prevention?
Yep, it seems to be helpful for that, too. Supplementary zinc taken on a daily basis appears to help prevent pesky colds from striking in the first place. In studies, children receiving supplements for at least 5 months had fewer colds and fewer absentee days from school.